Vera Rondano

Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, Room A316, Fowler Museum, 308 Charles E Young Dr N, Los Angeles, CA 90095





Email


Education

B.A. Classics and Oriental Studies, Oxford University

M.A. Egyptology, Oxford University 

Areas of Interest

Late Period Egypt, ancient economy, ancient technology, cultural interactions in the ancient Mediterranean world, innovations in mortuary practices.

Profile

Vera Rondano is originally from Italy. Her undergraduate degree is in Classics and Oriental Studies from Oxford University, where she also obtained a Master of Philosophy in Egyptology. Her thesis focused on a collection of provenanced mummy-nets, currently kept by the Egyptian Museum in Turin, Italy. During her research, she reconstructed several mummy-nets and cataloged scarabs, amulets, and shabtis. Vera has collaborated with curators at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and the British Museum in London. She is currently interested in exploring the social dynamics behind the introduction and standardisation of new elements in burial assemblages of the Late Period in Egypt. In addition, she is interested in investigating issues related to spatial theory in the ancient world, particularly the evolution of liminal spaces in the Late and Graeco-Roman periods in Egypt. She aims to contextualize museum objects visually and spatially in ways that make ancient notions of sacred spaces more accessible and evocative to a modern, nonspecialist audience. 

Research

The origins of industrialization. Investigating the socio-economic system supporting proto-industrial societies. 

Field Experience

2012-2013, Internship at the Museo Egizio in Turin, Italy

2010 and 2011, Archaeological project in Los Bañales, Spain

2011 Apolline Project, Naples, Italy

Presentations

None as yet.

Awards

2016, UCLA Graduate Summer Research Mentorship, University of California Los Angeles

2016, Steinmetz Research Travel Grant, UCLA

2014, Santander Travel Award, Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford; 2014, Griffith Egyptological Fund, Griffith Institute, University of Oxford

Advisors

Dr. Kara Cooney and Dr. Willeke Wendrich